Humanist Discussion Group

Humanist Archives: April 2, 2021, 8:19 a.m. Humanist 34.312 - two puzzles attempted

				                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 34, No. 312.
        Department of Digital Humanities, University of Cologne
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        Date: 2021-04-01 07:13:17+00:00
        From: Manfred Thaller 
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 34.311: two puzzles attempted

Dear Willard, Dear Jan,

>> (2) When was the following quote published in a top rated academic
>> journal, '*' standing for something which might have been 'digital
>> humanities'?

> This one is easy, but why leads elsewhere. The answer is Richard T.
> Vann, "History and demography",  History and Theory , 1969, Vol. 9,
> Beiheft 9: Studies in Quantitative History and the Logic of the Social
> Sciences (1969), pp. 64-78.
> 2. 1969?

Brilliant!

That one was what was triggered the mail. Utter amusement, how
extraordinarily original some recent discussions are.

-----------------------

> 1. Soviet Union

Right. More precisely:

> [Ustinov 1964] Valentin Alekseevich Ustinov: /Primenenie
> Vychislitel'nykh Mashin v Istoricheskoi Nauke Dlia Analiza Massovykh
> Istoricheskikh Istochnikov/[The Application of Computers in the
> Science of History for Analyzing a Multitude of Historical Sources],
> Izdatel'stvo sotsial'no-ekonomi-cheskoi literatury "Mysl'," 1964.
> (Quoted after the extensive review by Stanley Humenuk, in: /History
> and Theory/6 (1967) 274-286.)

This one, I think, has actually more than a trivial pursuit value, but
pertains to some of the questions which Willard raised recently about
quantification. From the history of "computers in academia" it reminds
us that Akademgorodok was at some stage the first academic institution
where (relatively) ubiquitous access to computer resources was a central
design element.

More related to the discussion about 'quantification' I consider it as
support for my thesis, that quantification as such was not really the
point, but a willingness to use a specific theoretical framework which
could profit from it. In the case of the Soviet Union the scientist old
style Marxist understanding of history.

Nice Easter days / spring,
Manfred



Am 01.04.2021 um 08:10 schrieb Humanist:
>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 34, No. 311.
>          Department of Digital Humanities, University of Cologne
>                               Hosted by DH-Cologne
>                         www.dhhumanist.org
>                  Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org
>
>
>      [1]    From: Willard McCarty 
>             Subject: the puzzles (33)
>
>      [2]    From: Jan Rybicki 
>             Subject: ODP: [Humanist] 34.309: two puzzles (43)
>
>
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>          Date: 2021-04-01 06:02:32+00:00
>          From: Willard McCarty 
>          Subject: the puzzles
>
> Responding to Manfred's two puzzles, I have to guess at the first:
>
>> (1) In which country of the world the year 1964 saw the publication of a
>> 230 page university textbook on how to use computers in historical research?
> Germany, specifically Göttingen, more specifically the Max Planck
> Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte.
>
>> (2) When was the following quote published in a top rated academic
>> journal, '*' standing for something which might have been 'digital
>> humanities'?
> This one is easy, but why leads elsewhere. The answer is Richard T.
> Vann, "History and demography",  History and Theory , 1969, Vol. 9,
> Beiheft 9: Studies in Quantitative History and the Logic of the Social
> Sciences (1969), pp. 64-78.
>
> Finding the answer was easy because I've been collecting material on
> this and related subjects for a long time. So I have my own rather small
> (in relation to the Web) but rather large (for an individual)
> collection. What makes it interesting is the realisation that after some
> time collecting stuff one is interested in provides a diverse but shaped
> world to explore that mirrors but does not unduly constrain one's research.
>
> Comments?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty,
> Professor emeritus, King's College London;
> Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews;  Humanist
> www.mccarty.org.uk
>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>          Date: 2021-03-31 05:54:34+00:00
>          From: Jan Rybicki 
>          Subject: ODP: [Humanist] 34.309: two puzzles
>
> Dear Manfred,
> Off the top of my head:
> 1. Soviet Union
> 2. 1969?
> Tchuss,
> Jan
>
> -----Wiadomość oryginalna-----
> Od: Humanist 
> Wysłano: środa, 31 marca 2021 07:44
> Do: jkrybicki@gmail.com
> Temat: [Humanist] 34.309: two puzzles
>
>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 34, No. 309.
>          Department of Digital Humanities, University of Cologne
>                                  Hosted by DH-Cologne
>                         www.dhhumanist.org
>                  Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org
>
>
>
>
>          Date: 2021-03-30 08:50:00+00:00
>          From: Manfred Thaller 
>          Subject: Two puzzles
>
> Dear Humanists,
>
> forgive me for a trivia game in the history of computer usage in the
Humanities
> (historical flavour).
>
> (1) In which country of the world the year 1964 saw the publication of a
> 230 page university textbook on how to use computers in historical research?
>
> (2) When was the following quote published in a top rated academic journal,
'*'
> standing for something which might have been 'digital humanities'?
>
> "Fear of, and animosity toward, * is one of the facts of contemporary
scholarly
> life. To a considerable degree, it arises from competition for resources for
> research - a competition carried on with rhetorical and conceptual weapons."
>
> Apologies for wasting your time,
> Manfred Thaller

--
Prof. em. Dr. Manfred Thaller
Zuletzt Universität zu Köln /
Formerly University at Cologne


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