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Humanist Archives: March 30, 2020, 10:20 a.m. Humanist 33.708 - tree diagrams

                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 33, No. 708.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                   Hosted by King's Digital Lab
                       www.dhhumanist.org
                Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org


    [1]    From: Bethan Tovey 
           Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (60)

    [2]    From: Henry Schaffer 
           Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.705: tree-diagrams (251)


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: 2020-03-29 13:33:32+00:00
        From: Bethan Tovey 
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?

Have you come across The Book of Trees by Manuel Lima? It's a gorgeous
illustrated history/taxonomy of visualizing knowledge as trees.

Best,

Bethan

___________________________________________________
Dr. Bethan Tovey-Walsh

Myfyrwraig PhD | PhD Student CorCenCC
Prifysgol Abertawe | Swansea University

CV: LinkedIn

Croeso i chi ysgrifennu ataf yn y Gymraeg.
On 27 Mar 2020, 07:43 +0000, Humanist , wrote:
> Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 33, No. 701.
> Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
> Hosted by King's Digital Lab
> www.dhhumanist.org
> Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org
>
>
>
>
> Date: 2020-03-26 20:30:57+00:00
> From: Bernard Geoghegan 
> Subject: Tree diagrams in computer science and other fields (i.e. genealogy)
>
> [From SIGCIS, already bubbling with suggestions. - WM]
>
>
> Dear Colleagues,
>
> A little query sent across the lockdowns and quarantines: Can anyone
> recommend scholarship on the tree-style diagrams that circulate both in
> computer science and a wide range of other fields, for example,
> genealogy, kinship? Is there any good work on the history of these
> diagrams, their intersection, and what they might say about possible
> links in styles of reasoning across fields that might, otherwise, seem
> remote?
>
> Thanks for your thoughts,
>
> b
>
> --
>
> Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan
> Senior Lecturer in the History and Theory of Digital Media
> Chair of the UG Assessment Board, Digital Culture
> www.bernardg.com
> Department of Digital Humanities
> King's College London
> The Strand Building
> Room S3.08
> WC2R 2LS
> Office: +44 (0)20 7848 4750


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: 2020-03-28 21:35:36+00:00
        From: Henry Schaffer 
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.705: tree-diagrams

In dendrograms / tree diagrams, the length of the lines connecting items
often represents some quantity such as degree of resemblance.

However there is another area where the graphs are similar but the
terminology (and perhaps the uses) differ and that is in the graph
theory portion of mathematics. Specifically "directed graphs" where there
are "vertices" which are connected by "edges" (or maybe they are "nodes"
which are connected by "arcs" :-) and the "directed" means those edges/arcs
are essentially arrows. Often they just show a connection without
indicating a length. I have used "directed acyclic graphs" in some of my
studies - where the "acyclic" denotes (surprise!) the absence of cycles.

There is a substantial amount of math and computer science work in this
area as there are aspects of industry which can be described in this way
and for which computation is required to obtain optimal or even good
results.

--henry schaffer

On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 5:27 AM Humanist  wrote:

>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 33, No. 705.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                    Hosted by King's Digital Lab
>                        www.dhhumanist.org
>                 Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org
>
>
>     [1]    From: Jeremy Browne 
>            Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (58)
>
>     [2]    From: Robert Delius Royar 
>            Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (18)
>
>     [3]    From: Nathaniel  Bobbitt 
>            Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (28)
>
>     [4]    From: Peter Jones 
>            Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (23)
>
>     [5]    From: David Zeitlyn 
>            Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams? (29)
>
>
>
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: 2020-03-27 15:56:30+00:00
>         From: Jeremy Browne 
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
> I cannot point you to any specific research or history on those types of
> charts,
> but the technical name is "dendrogram." Using that term will probably get
> you in
> the right direction.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrogram
>
> --jeremy
>
> ________________________________________
> From: Humanist 
> Sent: Friday, March 27, 2020 1:43 AM
> To: publish-liv@humanist.kdl.kcl.ac.uk
> Subject: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 33, No. 701.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                    Hosted by King's Digital Lab
>                        www.dhhumanist.org
>                 Submit to: humanist@dhhumanist.org
>
>
>
>
>         Date: 2020-03-26 20:30:57+00:00
>         From: Bernard Geoghegan 
>         Subject: Tree diagrams in computer science and other fields (i.e.
> genealogy)
>
> [From SIGCIS, already bubbling with suggestions. - WM]
>
>
> Dear Colleagues,
>
> A little query sent across the lockdowns and quarantines: Can anyone
> recommend scholarship on the tree-style diagrams that circulate both in
> computer science and a wide range of other fields, for example,
> genealogy, kinship? Is there any good work on the history of these
> diagrams, their intersection, and what they might say about possible
> links in styles of reasoning across fields that might, otherwise, seem
> remote?
>
> Thanks for your thoughts,
>
> b
>
> --
>
> Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan
> Senior Lecturer in the History and Theory of Digital Media
> Chair of the UG Assessment Board, Digital Culture
> www.bernardg.com
> Department of Digital Humanities
> King's College London
> The Strand Building
> Room S3.08
> WC2R 2LS
> Office: +44 (0)20 7848 4750
>
>
>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: 2020-03-27 11:49:59+00:00
>         From: Robert Delius Royar 
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
> At risk of being thought simple, I will direct attention to the article
> "Figurative system of human knowledge" in the Wikipedia
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figurative_system_of_human_knowledge. The
> diagram appeared in the for the Encyclopédie by Jean le Rond d'Alembert
> and Denis Diderot (mid 18th c.). it is referred to as "the tree of Diderot
> and d'Alembert." The diagram is probably not the first. I suspect there are
> models of such diagrams earlier because my eidetic memory includes an image
> of a diagram with handwriting that may have been in a medieval manuscript.
> I also suspect that if one were to investigate Camillo, Bembo, Manutius,
> Erasmus and 16th century printing, hse would find additional examples of
> branching diagrams. They are superb memory aids and very portable.
>
>
>
> --
>                Robert Delius Royar
>  Caught in the net since 1985
>
>
>
> --[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: 2020-03-27 11:38:48+00:00
>         From: Nathaniel  Bobbitt 
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
> Bernard,
>
> The following serve for functional control and for tree design of hierarchy
> across various domains.
>
> Functional trees (comparative) use of cladistics
>
> Harvey, P. H., & Pagel, M. D. (1991). The comparative method in
> evolutionary
> biology (Vol. 239). Oxford: Oxford university press.
>
>
> Knowledge systems and facet analysis
>
> Gopinath, M. A. (1992). Ranganathan's theory of facet analysis and
> knowledge
> representation. DESIDOC Journal of Library & Information Technology, 12(5).
>
> Priss, U. (2008). Facet-like structures in computer science. Axiomathes,
> 18(2),
> 243-255
>
> Keet, C. M. (2006). A taxonomy of types of granularity. In GrC (pp.
> 106-111).
>
> Allwein, G., & Barwise, J. (Eds.). (1996). Logical reasoning with diagrams
> (Vol.
> 6). Oxford University Press.
>
>
>
> Nathaniel Bobbitt
>
>
>
> --[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: 2020-03-27 10:09:47+00:00
>         From: Peter Jones 
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
> Hello Bernard,
> There is quite an old book on genograms:
> https://www.amazon.co.uk/Genograms-Assessment-Intervention-Norton-
> Professional/dp/0393702944
> 
> Generally there was also work on the application of visualization in the
> social
> sciences in the 1990s, that included many reports and events "Thinking with
> Diagrams":
>
> ARCHIVED at:
> Advisory Group on Computer Graphics (AGOCG)
>
>
> Often wonder and may have posted previously about revisiting this theme.
> The Computer Journal may be useful with a specific search:
> https://academic.oup.com/comjnl
> Be Well, Be Safe,
> Peter-------
> Peter Jones
> Community Mental Health Nurse, Tutor & Researcher
> Blogging at "Welcome to the QUAD"
> http://hodges-model.blogspot.com/
> http://twitter.com/h2cm
>
>
>
> --[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: 2020-03-27 08:52:21+00:00
>         From: David Zeitlyn 
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 33.701: tree diagrams?
>
> Nice question.
>
> See Bouquet, M. 1996. "Family Trees and Their Affinities - the Visual
> Imperative
> Of the Genealogical Diagram." Journal Of the Royal Anthropological
> Institute 2
> (1): 43-66.
>
> A sample follows:
> "Bourdieu (1977: 37-8) posed the questions of what lies behind he graphic
> representation of kinship, and recommended a social history of the
> genealogical
> tool (1977: 207). Bourdieu's call for "an epistemological study of the mode
> of investigation which is a precondition for the production of a
> genealogical
> diagram" (1977: 207), is interpreted here exclusively in terms of visual
> discourse, as part of what Rudwick (1976) has called the "visual language"
> of science. Gifford-Gonzalez (1993: 26) has discussed the way artists mine
> "arcane specialist knowledge to make simulacra, realistic images of things
> that don't exist in the present world", for illustrations of palaeolithic
> life. The genealogical diagram performs an analogous operation, drawing
> upon a
> genre, a metaphor in Young's (1993) terms -- the family tree -- so that
> "the visual representations also become an argument for the credibility of
> the
> scientists' inferences" Gifford-Gonzalez (1993: 26)." Bouquet 1996: 45
>
>
> There are also some nice examples of varying styles of visual
> representation
> used in different cultural traditions to represent kin relationships. I
> can dig
> some out with time.
>
> david



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